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American Robins

American Robins

 

The American Robin is a member of the thrush family that is found throughout North America. These ground feeders have red/orange breasts, white bellies, and grey everywhere else. They are often seen foraging on the ground in the warmer months, hunting for earthworms and bugs. In the winter, they often travel in large flocks, concentrating near food sources. Robins are right at home in Robin nest with 2 blue eggsneighborhoods and rural areas alike, building nests on porches and windowsills, and in shrubs and trees. They are one of the first songs heard in spring, as males scout out and defend nest territories.                

Fledgling Robin chick

 Robin young will fledge from their nests before they can fly and are often mistakenly "rescued" while they are hopping on the ground. If you see a fledgling that looks generally healthy but cannot fly, observe it for an hour or so from afar as the parents are generally pretty close by bringing it food and teaching it how to interact with its environment.  





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