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Wood Thrushes

Wood Thrushes

Wood Thrushes are commonly heard, although not often seen. They have a beautiful, flute-like call that can be heard throughout local woodlands in the summer. These ground birds have brown upperparts and a spotted white breast. This allows for excellent camouflage while they hop around leaf litter looking for insects to eat. While they do spend most of their time on the ground, they will fly up into low branches or downed trees to get a look around. Wood Thrushes are smaller in size than Robins, although they have similar mannerisms. They typically have 1 to 2 broods per year, and nests are usually about 10-15' off the ground in a tree. These birds are unfortunately in decline, and it has been suggested that it is partially a result of declining insect and other invertebrate availability and from the parasitism of their nests from cowbirds. 





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