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June Bird of the Month: House Wren

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June Bird of the Month: House Wren

Not to be confused with the Carolina Wren, this Wren is a warm weather visitor to our area, normally coming back in May and departing in September. House Wrens have the typical wren shape, with small and round bodies, long beaks, and pointy tails that are often held up in the air. House Wrens are mostly brown, with some darker baring on their wings, helping them blend in well with their surroundings.

House Wren coming out of a bird house.

Like most wrens, they have distinctive trilling calls that are surprisingly loud for their size. House Wrens prefer cavities for nesting and will readily use bird houses if they’re available. If they’re not, be on the lookout for nests in other cavities they may find to their liking, including unused flowerpots or drainpipes! These are busy little birds that don’t stay put for long, and spend a lot of time foraging throughout the understory looking for food and nesting materials.

House Wren gathering nest materials and food.





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