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New Hydrangea Varieties for 2024 at The Mill of Kingstown

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Hydrangea Pop Star

Hydrangeas stand out as one of the most coveted shrubs in today's gardening scene, evoking nostalgic memories of the ones our grandmothers tended to in years past. Through dedicated plant propagation efforts, Hydrangea macrophylla has undergone various transformations, yielding an assortment of new varieties. Within nursery circles, you'll encounter an assortment of species, including Hydrangea macrophylla, arborescens, quercifolia, petiolaris, paniculata, serrata, and aspera.

Making its debut this year, courtesy of Bailey Nurseries and handpicked by First Editions, is the Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Eclipse’. Standing between 3 to 5 feet in height and width, this hydrangea boasts striking burgundy foliage, with flower hues ranging from pink to blue based on soil pH. Thriving in horticultural zones 5-9, it retains its foliage color admirably even in warmer climates. For optimal aesthetics, plant it in partial sunlight, shielding it from the heat of the afternoon. Plant Eclipse in moist organic soil with ample space to flourish and water the base as needed.  Its blooms are abundant from July through September. Nurseries preserve its optimal color by placing it under a 50% shade cloth.

Varieties of Hydrangea new at The Mill of Kingstown

Another notable addition to the Hydrangea family is H. aspera ‘Burgundy Bliss', a rarity in the market since its unveiling in 2023. Characterized by its velvety large leaves, which emerge in a rich maroon hue before transitioning to a green-bronze tone during the summer heat, this variety adds a touch of elegance to any garden. The underside of its leaves retains its dark burgundy color, which plays well in the landscape when positioned in areas with good air circulation. Flourishing in zones 7-9, it thrives in moist organic soils and produces pink to mauve lace cap flowers throughout the summer. Expect Burgundy Bliss to reach a height and width of 6-8 feet, making it a stunning focal point in any landscape. For optimal growth, prune it immediately after flowering, and watch it mature into an impressive showpiece, particularly when the breeze dances through its leaves.

Another variety introduced from Bailey Nurseries, Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Pop Star’ makes its mark as a new addition to the Endless Summer series in 2023. This compact beauty, reaching a modest three feet in height, requires no pruning which sets it apart from contemporary hydrangeas. Its lace cap flowers grace both old and new wood, extending its bloom period throughout the summer. Flower color, as is typical of hydrangeas, is influenced by the soil pH. Optimal placement includes morning sun with afternoon shade, nestled in moist organic soils. Ensure regular watering to facilitate full flower production, allowing this Pop Star to shine in your garden.

We eagerly anticipate offering these captivating varieties in our garden center this season. For the best selection of shrubs, stop in at The Mill early in the season!





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