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February Bird of the Month: Eastern Screech Owl

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February Bird of the Month: Eastern Screech Owl

Eastern Screech Owls are located in our area year-round. They are one of our smallest owl species, and have two different color morphs, red, or rufous, and grey. Similar to other owls, Eastern Screech Owls are exceptionally well camouflaged, regardless of color morph, making them incredibly hard to see.

Eastern Screech Owl In a Tree Hole

Eastern Screech Owls can be found in city parks, the suburbs, and rural areas, but will be primarily drawn to areas with plenty of available trees and prey. They are cavity nesters, which means they need nest boxes or holes in dead trees to nest; this is a good reason to leave standing dead trees upright.

Eastern Screech Owl

Like most owls, Eastern Screech Owls spend most of the day roosting in holes or thick cover, and become much more active at dusk. They eat a variety of prey, including large insects, small rodents, song birds, frogs, and earthworms. Pairs of Eastern Screech Owls will lay 4-5 eggs on average, with the female being the sole incubator. Once the eggs hatch, both male and female will provide food for the young, even after they have left the nest.





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